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#580146 11/05/14 05:50 AM
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Hello all,

I've got a matching black 565HK and 107A loudspeaker in like new condition. Is there a way to safely use it without a power supply without damaging the unit? It will work (not super loud, but usable) if I connect the four leads to the each of the handset leads. Is it alright to do this? I know it isn't the correct way...

If someone does have a power supply that's sitting around unused, I'd love to give a new home...PM me smile

Thanks,

Scott


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Scott -

The 107 (spokesman or orator) requires 18vac to function properly. It will work with a 2012b transformer OR with 18vac found on all 1A2 power supplies.

Connect the red wire from the 107 to terminal R on the phone's network. Connect the green wire to terminal GN on the network and connect the black and yellow wires to 18 volts AC from the power supply. If you need an external transformer, I probably have one, but why use one if you've got a working 1A2 system?

Sam

Last edited by Silversam; 11/06/14 08:15 PM.

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Actually, the R and G leads on a 107A (and the later version, the 107B) are not capacitively-coupled as they feed the input of the amplifier. If you put them across the T & R you are placing a direct short across the pair. The design intends you to put the R and G leads across the receiver leads in the set (in parallel with the two white handset cords leads on the network screws.)

This method has two advantages: It is capacitively-coupled, by design of the network's receiver circuit, and the volume of the local and distant speech will be equalized by the network. Putting the leads on the T & R will result in very high level when you speak, and very low level when the distant party speaks. Using the receiver leads will make both ends have equal loudness.

You can send 18Vac to the set from the KSU on any spare pair, for instance, one of the yellow pairs, and terminate them on spare screws for the Spokesman® power feed.

The later 107B solved the capacitor problem, by using a 6-lead mounting cord, with the R and G being the same as the 107A, but the Bl and W leads have capacitors in series with them. Both pairs (R&G, W&Bl) go to the same input of the amplifier.

One caution: You may get A-C hum in the speaker if you use the grounded 18 Volts from the key system power unit. If you do, reverse the power leads, or use an outboard isolated transformer at the KSU location.

You can easily modify the Spokesman (or any other device needing speech-isolation caps), by cannibalizing the 0.47mFd caps from a 400D KTU. Just connect them to the screws inside the speaker in series with the R and G leads.


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You guys never cease to amaze me...
laugh


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Yes, we are the dinosaurs your Mother warned you about.



Arthur P. Bloom
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Arthur, in those 15 years on hold, have you heard any good songs? grin


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Those first 15 years when the most of the HOLD was endured were in the 1970's and early 80's. Music on hold was not a typical feature, so "no" I didn't hear many good songs then. What I DID hear were dozens of other repairmen, also on hold, because the way the holding bridges were designed allowed a very faint signal to cross over from one line to the next. If you shouted into the test set, you might be able to get other guys to hear you, resulting is a very weird multi-person conversation.

I got to read many books when on hold. All the original James Bond, Travis McGee and Nero Wolfe/Archie Goodwin. Read Ulysses from front to back (talk about an amazing, yet mind-numbing book) and tried several times to read War & Peace, but could only get through the first chapter, about 8 times.

To get back to the subject of Spokesmen, most of us carried one, with a couple of 9-volt batteries taped to it, to be put across the pair when we were on hold. This allowed us to put the test set down on the floor while reading with the angle flashlight above the cross box terminal. When the tester came on the line, we would quickly grab the test set and get back to work. (Yes, we put caps in series with the R & G leads).

I saw many more Spokesmen in use by field employees (and on phone company bosses' desks) than I ever did on subscribers' premises. Same thing with 4A speakerphones.


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out here would use as speakers for our portable radios, and tie then to the wands for louder toning, but mostly as the speaker for shout down circuits in stock houses

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Yes, the good old crosstalk. I've listened to so many of the Evan Doorbell tapes so I'm familiar with it. Wish I couldv'e been around to toy around with the old network. It really was "alive," in its own way.

Scott


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Alright, so I've had a look at my KSU and it has a 28D2 power unit, with two taps for 24VDC, and one for 10VAC lamps and one 18VAC, which I'm assuming is normally for buzzers. What would be the best way to accomplish pushing the 18VAC to the Spokesman without setting my room on fire?

Also, I have another random question... I have a 4-line W/E KSU. The cover says the ringer equivalence is 5.0A. Why so high?

Thanks guys!


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Here it is, in case anyone wanted to see:

[Linked Image from s24.postimg.org]


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1. The REN on the KSU means that it will place that maximum amount of load across any of the four CO T&R pairs. The REN advice is a product of Divestiture, when AT&T equipment, previously installed by the BOC (Bell Operating Company) as part of the whole "System" was considered proprietary equipment, and not subject to the FCC rules that governed "non-Bell" equipment, as used by interconnect companies. When Divestiture occurred on 1-1-1984, the company that would become AT&T-IS (AT&T-Information Systems) became just one more interconnect company, and was forced, (to keep the playing field even) to make all of its equipment conform to the rules that governed everyone else.

That 5.0 REN assumes one 400-type line card, and four line ringers, across any typical CO connection. A REN of 5.0 is the maximum that a CO line is required to power, under the tariffs (government rules.)

2. In a shoebox, you've got a 66 block. The horizontal pins are called ROWS. The vertical COLUMNS are lettered A through F on a B model, and A through E on the C model.

On pins 41 and 42, at the lower RIGHT corner of the 66 block in your KSU, you will find GRD and 18Vac, respectively.

Count backwards (up direction) from the last pin which is 50.

On pins 41 & 42 on the LEFT side of the same block, the pins are spare. Hooray.

Turn the power off (pull the plug, or remove the black fuse thingie) while connecting to those pins, to avoid letting the smoke out.

Do you have a 551 B or a 551 C?

On a "B" version KSU you can just install a pair of bridging clips from 41 & 42 on the right side (column D) over to 41 & 42 on the left side (column C). Then simply punch down a spare pair (the yellow/brown pair is typically used for this) on column A going out to the telephone set.

On a "C" version KSU it ain't so easy, because the morons who designed the C version did something silly on pins 41 & 42 of the left side of the block.

The 66 block has 5 columns. Speaking specifically about pins 41 & 42, column A is connected to column B, but is NOT connected to column C. You need to punch down your telephone power pair on column C. (Do not use column A or column B) THEN put the bridging clip across from column C to column D. Do this on pin 41 (GRD) and on pin 42 (18Vac).

Now GRD and 18Vac will appear on the left side, and you can use them to connect the pair going to your telephone set.

Google "518-215-407 BSP" and when you've got it in front of you, scroll down to the diagrams of the power connections. You'll be able to see what I'm talking about.


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A side note: the standard Western Electric telephone had a REN of 1. RBOCS, knowing how many telephones each address was paying for, could test the impedance of a telephone line and determine if the correct number of telephones were connected. If there was a discrepancy, Ma Bell would pay an unannounced visit to check things out.

My dad leased 1 telephone from New England Telephone. The prior owner of the house left a vintage 1957 C/D 500 behind (not sure how that happened back in 1967) in the master bedroom. New England Telephone wired the extension, so the company should have had it documented. My dad removed the ringer assembly and kept the phone. We still have the phone. My dad switched the cord from a four prong to modular. I installed a new ringer several years ago. The handset is amplified and has the thumb wheel.


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Yikes, I have a 551C. Looks like this is an endeavour that will have to wait until I get back from my business trip. I will post an update here when I return.

@Paul:

I too find it strange that they forgot the phone. I would think they would be pretty anal about phones considering they were Ma Bell's property...

Thanks all!


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is there away to use a 107a as a monitor with a modern pots phone system?

I would like to power it with a 9v dc? can i simply connect the black and yellow to the 9v and then the red and green to the pots two line? is the pots two line the tip and ring?

could i do the same with a 18v ac instead of the 9vdc?

thanks

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Go to the whites of the handset don't use DC for an AC application it won't end well.
What's that white bordered square thing with that funny looking thing in front of it in the picture? Yes it's Friday I'm enjoying one of my few days off after putting out fires all week on equipment that nobody is qualified to work on anymore,but me. And I'm a youngster at 53. Oh wait I was in diapers when I started. And probably will be when I retire.


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So if I have the 18v ac would I connect that to the black and yellow on the monitor and then the handset wires to the green/red on the handset wires. Thanks

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You are correct.


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thanks

i have the spokesman working now with a 9v (black and yellow) and an iphone via red/green and the headphone jack - will be trying the telephone soon

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